Jacuzzi automation

Today I planned to program the Raspberry Pi in order to start the filtration pump and turn on the underwater lights when we are using the jacuzzi.

I needed some magnetic contacts in order to close a contact pin from the GPIO. Unfortunately, it seems that most hardware store are no more carrying these in their inventory. So I bought a cheap door alarm and disassembled it in order to use the magnetic contact for my sensor.

Cheap alarm with magnetic contact
Cheap alarm with magnetic contact
Lid sensor
Lid sensor
Lid sensor test
Lid sensor test

Jacuzzi transport from Apples to Lyss

Currently the jaccuzi is still in Apples. Today, at 7:00 it’s time to leave Lyss to go to Apples in order to load and transport the jacuzzi.

Leaving Lyss to pickup the jacuzzi...
Leaving Lyss to pickup the jacuzzi…

After we finished to saw the floor of the cabin, it was time to try to load it on the Dyna while the wood burner and the frame were already loaded on the truck’s deck…

Loading the cabin on the Dyna
Loading the cabin on the Dyna
Ready to leave Apples
Ready to leave Apples

Now it’s time to pack the remaining pieces of the jacuzzi. A picture of the hydraulic aggregate connections… just to remember how to connect it back.

Just to remember how to reconnect the hydraulic aggregate...
Just to remember how to reconnect the hydraulic aggregate…

Done! Ready to go to Yverdon-les-Bains in order to pickup the steel bars that we brought to the galvanoplasty workshop.

First shopping tour

Today was my first trip to Hornbach in order to buy the material needed to start the construction of the jacuzzi.

  • 2 colliers 150 avec tige filetée pour l’écartement
  • bâche plastique 6x8m
  • 3x plaque de tôle galvanisée 200x100x1
  • lumière cabine (lampe, interrupteur et prise IP 67)
  • presse étoupe M20
  • adaptateur robinet cuisine 1/2 – 3/4
  • 2x boîte dérivation IP 68
  • 10m GD 2×0.75
  • panneau pour fond box 14*27 cm
  • adaptateur 3/4 (Gardena)
  • mousse isolante pour tuyau 4cm x 8m
  • oxygène actif
  • activateur d’oxygène
  • kit de contrôle pH / peroxyde
  • 2x fiche / prise CEE 16A
  • 10m GD 5×1.5mm

Some hours later, it looks like that 😉

First shopping trip...
… just a small sample of the material…

As we now have a steel frame, I decided to add some underwater led lights in the jacuzzi, fixed on the frame by strong magnets.

Magnetic stands for imerged lights
Magnetic stands for underwater lights

Building the Jacuzzi frame

The jaccuzzi.ch team created a lot of jacuzzi based on wooden palettes frames, like the one we built during the ig100 event in Crans-Montana.

IG100 in Crans-Montana
IG100 in Crans-Montana

For this one, we wanted something that can be isolated in order to avoid excessive heat losses during night. Following an unfortunate encounter between a forklift and a sectional door, we had the raw material.

After a day of sawing, drilling and grinding, we had 13 isolated panels assembled to form our 3m diagonal jacuzzi frame.

New jacuzzi structure made of sectional garage door elements
New jacuzzi structure made of sectional garage door elements
Sectional garage door reminder
Sectional garage door reminder

Building temperature probes

As a long time fan of the 1-wire bus, and due to its integration on the Raspberry Pi chipset, I decided to build some probes for the jacuzzi.

Waterproof probes

The idea is taken from this DIY waterproof probe based on the DS18B20 1-wire sensor. I tried to keep it small, so I choose a Bic pen tube as the container.

First temperature sensor embedded in a pen tube
First temperature sensor embedded in a pen tube

Unfortunately, the diameter of the tube was too small and the sensor was not correctly immersed in silicon. For the second edition, I used a pen tube from our university… Now I have nice probes that are really waterproof, but a bit larger than the first try.

Second revision of an embedded temperature sensor in a pen tube
Second revision of an embedded temperature sensor in a pen tube

Inline probes

To measure temperatures in the cabin, outdoor and on the heater circuits, I needed some probes that I could chain together. For these ones, I used RJ45 female adapters and put the sensor inside the case. Both sides of the adapters are wired together, so it’s quite easy to solder a sensor between the RJ45 sockets.

Temperature sensor embedded in a double RJ45 adapter
Temperature sensor embedded in a double RJ45 adapter

A dream comes to life

After enjoying the pleasure of a hot-tub in front of the house during our Whistler holidays, we decided to repeat the experience in Lyss…
I should say… the experiment as this will be a wood heated home made Jacuzzi!
The project started some weeks ago while meeting with Nicolas, the proud owner of a hand made Jacuzzi and best maker I know.